Why do I have difficulty equalising ear pressures when diving or on a plane?

The Eustachian tube joins the back of our nose with the middle part of our ear and is responsible for matching or equalising the pressure between our environment and ears. When we fly or dive, the air pressure changes quickly and if the eustachian tube can’t react fast enough, the ears can block or hurt. Yawning or swallowing usually opens the Eustachian tube and allows air to enter the middle ear, equalising the pressure. The Eustachian tube can be affected by hearing loss, such as a cold or wax plug, or it can simply stop working as well. At Resonate we use a machine called a tympanometer to measure how well your middle ear works.

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Why do I have difficulty equalising ear pressures when diving or on a plane?

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